N.W.O.A.M.E Math Night

April 2nd, 2017

Problems in Your Math Class?
Well, there are soon to be more – we hope!

A look at how problem solving
supports our understanding of mathematics

Presented by John Galbraith, Bev Marshman and Rob Gleeson
from the Centre for Education in Mathematics and Computing (CEMC) and all three with Thunder Bay connections.

John, Bev and Rob will share CEMC resources that aim to increase enjoyment, confidence and ability in mathematics. Through contests, face-to-face workshops, online resources, and publications, the CEMC provides curricular and enrichment support to elementary and secondary school students, teachers, and parents.
Breakout Sessions:
• Grade 4 – 6 Resources
• Grade 7 + Resources
• School, and Visits from the CEMC
(These sessions are dependent on numbers.)

Location: Hammarskjold High School Library
80 Clarkson St. South, Thunder Bay, ON P7B 4W8
Thursday, April 6, 2017
7:00 – 8:30 Presentation
All are welcome – no cost to listen and engage in discussion!

Pre-registration REQUIRED:    maria_casasola@lakeheadschools.ca
Indicate the Breakout Session you are most interested in!
Bring a device so you can check out the resources while you are there!

NWOAME Math Night

February 7th, 2017

NWOAME Math Night with TOM BOLAND

Mathematics and Well-being:  It’s Not About the Nail

Presented by Tom Boland

Tom has taught grades K – 8 and spent several years in Special Education. He is a published author, most recently publishing Leaps and Bounds Toward Mathematical Understanding, Grades 1/2, co-authored in 2015 and published by Nelson Education, and Mathematical Models for Teaching; Reasoning Without Memorization, co-authored with Dr. Ann Kajander and published in 2014 by Canadian Scholar’s Press.

It is Tom’s belief that ALL children deserve a safe and positive school experience, and that is the foundation of his most recent work. Together with colleagues Lori Carson and Dr. David Tranter, Tom is working to support teachers as they confront the ever increasing demands of simultaneously promoting well-being while doing all they can to support academic achievement.

 Location: Hammarskjold High School Library

80 Clarkson St. South

Thunder Bay, ON

P7B 4W8

Tuesday, February 21, 2017

7:00 – 8:30 Presentation

All are welcome – no cost to listen and engage in discussion!

Pre-registration REQUIRED: Corrine_RussellPritoula@lakeheadschools.ca 

Upcoming Math Olympics

February 29th, 2016

Due to conflicts with other events for school children in Thunder Bay, we have moved our Math Olympics date by one week. Our event will now be held on April 30 at Superior CVI. This year grade 6′s will also be invited to participate and have fun with math! Keep an eye on your email as registration forms and more information should be out soon.

March 2 Event is Full

February 20th, 2016

At this time we have reached the maximum capacity for registrations. If you would like to attend, you are still able to put yourself on a waiting list in case space opens in the meantime. Due to the number of early registrations we will not be allowing registration at the door as we have in the past. Please contact Jennifer Holm with questions or for more information (jholm@lakeheadu.ca).

Making the Most of Children’s Mathematical Thinking

February 12th, 2016

Upcoming NWOAME Math Night

Making the Most of Children’s Mathematical Thinking: A look at how to recognize and understand children’s mathematical thinking

Presented by Dr. Alex Lawson

Author of What to Look For: Understanding and Developing Student Thinking in Early Numeracy

Math educator, Alex Lawson, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Education with Lakehead University’s Faculty of Education. A former elementary classroom teacher, she has been director of the Multi-Data Convergence Lab at Lakehead University for the last decade, where hundreds of hours of children’s thinking have been documented and analyzed to improve elementary mathematical instruction and learning.

 

 Location: Tony & Adam’s

45 Court St. South

Thunder Bay, ON

P7B 2W7

Wednesday, March 2, 2016

6:00 – 7:00 Meet, greet and maybe order something to eat

7:00 – 8:30 Presentation

Food and drinks will be available for purchase.

All are welcome – no cost to listen and engage in discussion!

 

Pre-registration REQUIRED: Jennifer Holm jholm@lakeheadu.ca

Upcoming Events: Save the Date

February 3rd, 2016

Save the date for two upcoming events:

NWOAME Math Evening with Alex Lawson: “Making the Most of Children’s Mathematical Thinking” on March 2 starting at 6:30. More details to follow soon.

Regional Math Olympics on April 23 for grade 7 and 8 students. New this year: Grade 6′s will be invited to participate. More details will be posted soon!

Friday’s Pi Day Art Activity

March 13th, 2015

Last day of school before the big Pi Day! Today’s activities are different ways you can use circles to create art.

The first is an art activity about  Tessellating a Circle

The second is a an activity with creating circle designs. Since the article also contains images, it has been included for you as a pdf: Circle Designs

Have fun!

 

Thursday’s Pi Day Activity

March 12th, 2015

Two days until the big day! Have fun celebrating with your students tomorrow.

Today’s activity uses Geometer’s Sketchpad to create pi. The link for the entire document with images can be found here: Pi Day Activity GSP. Enjoy!

A Recipe for Pi

Open up GSP4 and select new from the File Menu. Maximize the screen.
Use the Circle tool to create a circle. Click on the screen to create the circle. How far you drag determines the size – which can always be changed.
Use the select tool to choose the circle you just made on the screen.
Choose MEASURE from the grey toolbar at the top of the screen and then from the pull down menu select circumference.
GSP will automatically measure the circumference of the circle.   Since this is dynamic software, as you change the size of the circle, it will automatically change the measurement.   Test this out by using the SELECT TOOL to grab the point on the circumference and move it around so that its size changes.
Using the SELECT TOOL click on the CENTRE of the circle and the point on the CIRCUMFERENCE. The select arrow will turn sideways to let you know that you can select something. Then from the grey tool bar at the top of the page choose CONSTRUCT and from the drop down menu choose SEGMENT.
That segment represents the radius. To measure the radius, use the SELECT TOOL to choose the line segment. Then from the grey tool bar at the top of the page choose MEASURE and from the drop down menu choose LENGTH.
For this recipe for pi we need the diameter, the distance from edge to edge through the centre of the circle. To make the diameter, choose MEASURE for the grey toolbar at the top of the page and from the drop down toolbar, choose CALCULATE.   This will activate the calculator.
To make the diameter, the radius needs to be doubled. Select the measurement of the radius by clicking on it and it will automatically go into the CALCULATOR. Don’t type in the measurement. To multiply by two choose *(this means multiplication) and 2 then click on OK.
Finally, choose MEASURE for the grey toolbar at the top of the page and from the drop down toolbar, choose CALCULATE. Use the calculator, and drag in the circumference of the circle, click on ÷ and click on the DIAMETER (radius x 2 that you just calculated) and then click on OK.
At this point you should have pi π (approximately 3.14).   Pi is the ratio of the circumference of a circle divided by the diameter. It is a constant and doesn’t change. To prove this, click on the point on the edge of the circle and drag it to make it larger and smaller. All of the other measurements should change as you change the size of the circle, but pi will remain the same!

Another Pi Day Activity

March 11th, 2015

Pi Day Activities: Do or Die by the Digits of Pi

This activity for the gym involves basketball shooting skills and the digits of pi.

Materials needed: 1 basketball per pair or group of students and a printout of the digits of pi (can be posted on wall behind basketball net).

  • The general premise for the game is the digits of Pi dictate how many chances you get to make a shot.

Variation 1 (This works with a larger number of students since more can use one basketball net at a time.)

  • Player A starts. Since the first digit is 3, Player A has 3 chances to get make the shot. The instructor can decide where the players need to shoot from.
  • If A makes the shot within the 3 chances, he/she moves to the back of the line without a consequence.
  • If Player A misses , he/she moves on to the back of the line after completing a consequence off to the side. The consequence can be push ups, mountain climbers, burpees jumping jacks or sit ups. That is up to the discretion of the instructor.
  • The consequence is also tied to the digits of pi. Since pi is approximately 3, the players multiply the digit of pi that they missed by 3. For example if the player had 5 chances to get the basekt ball in and they miss, they get 5 x 3 = 15 push ups as a consequence.
  • Player B gets his/her turn right after Player A regardless of whether or not the basketball goes in. They use the next digit to determine how many chances they get.
  • The game continues with every player getting their chance based on the digit of pi that corresponds with their turn.

Variation 2 ( This works better with a small number of students.)

  • Player A starts. Since the first digit is 3, Player A has 3 chances to get make the shot. The instuctor can decide where they take the shot from.
  • If A makes the shot within the 3 chances, he/she moves on to the next digit.
  • If Player A misses , it is now the Player B’s turn. Player B takes up where Player A leaves off in terms of the digit.

Link to pdf: Pi Day Activities Do or Die by the Digits of Pi

Pi Day Coming Soon!

March 10th, 2015

This year is a very special pi day with the most number of digits being possible this Saturday, March 14 at 9:26:53! (3.14 15 926 53)

To celebrate this special day, we will post classroom activities you could use on Friday to have some fun with your students too! At the bottom of each post will be a link to a pdf of the game or activity for you to use.

Today’s suggested activity:

Pi Day Activities: Duck, Duck, Goose, Shark 

This is a variation of that favourite childhood game. The addition of the role of the shark allows students to recognize that three times the diameter of the circle is approximately equal to the circumference of the circle, since three is an approximation for p.

  •  A group of players sit in a circle, facing inward, while another player, the ‘picker’ (a.k.a. the ‘fox’), walks around tapping or pointing to each player in turn, calling each a ‘duck’ until finally picking one to be a ‘goose’ .
  • Traditionally, the ‘goose’ then rises and chases and tries to tag the ‘picker’, while the ‘picker’ tries to return to and sit where the ‘goose’ had been sitting.
  • The Pi Day twist is that when the ‘goose’ rises he/she must look across the diameter of the circle and call out the ‘shark’.
  • The ‘goose’ and the ‘picker’ race in opposite directions around the circumference of the circle.
  • The ‘shark’ must race across the diameter of the circle 3 times. Each time the ‘shark’ makes it across the diameter of the circle they touch the ground.
  • There are now two empty spots and three players racing for them.
  • The ‘goose’ and the ‘picker’ must each run the complete circumference before the one who did not make it back to the first empty spot can try to beat the ‘shark’ back to final empty spot.
  • Whoever, is left standing without a spot, whether it is the ‘picker’, the ‘goose’ or the ‘shark’, becomes the ‘picker’ and the game begins again.

Link: Pi Day Activities Duck, Duck, Goose Shark